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Technical / AS IV - RBT IV

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Question ID:
 /496
Link Title:
 /Accuracy Check Methods
Link:
Section:
 /ASIV - RBTIV
SubPart:
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Tag:
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Either a wet bath or dry gas standard can be used to check accuracy and perform calibrations.  Check the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) requirements of your program as it may dictate the methodology that you use.

Question ID:
 /504
Link Title:
 /Intoximeters Repair Information
Link:
Section:
 /ASIV - RBTIV
SubPart:
 /
Tag:
 /
Article Type:
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The Alco-Sensor IV cannot detect that the breath flow sensor is connected.  As a result, the instrument’s automatic sampling system is disabled.   Only manual samples can be taken.   This situation will require that the instrument be sent to the factory for repair.

Question ID:
 /528
Link Title:
 /
Link:
 
Section:
 /ASIV - RBTIV
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 /
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VOID 14, or Voided Analysis, indicates that the instrument detected a possible problem with the fuel cell signal. The characteristics of each sample are compared against a set of internally stored characteristics from the last calibration or accuracy check, which would have been performed with an ethanol standard.  If the fuel cell signal being analyzed during a sample is significantly different from the stored characteristics, the instrument prefers to reject that test, flagging it as VOID 14.  

This could be caused by two scenarios. The first is a combination of normal aging of the fuel cell and long periods of time between calibrations or accuracy checks. The first thing to try would be a calibration, followed by an accuracy check (assuming you are authorized to perform calibrations). If this does not resolve the VOID 14 issue, the instrument may need to be returned to Intoximeters for service. The second possible cause would be that the sample provided contained high levels of alcohols other than ethanol. If this is suspected, the subject may be in need of immediate medical attention.”

Question ID:
 /504
Link Title:
 /Intoximeters Repair Information
Link:
Section:
 /
SubPart:
 /
Tag:
 /
Article Type:
 /

The Alco-Sensor IV cannot detect that the breath flow sensor is connected.  As a result, the instrument’s automatic sampling system is disabled.   Only manual samples can be taken.   This situation will require that the instrument be sent to the factory for repair.

Question ID:
 /511
Link Title:
 /Purchase Batteries
Link:
Section:
 /ASIV - RBTIV
SubPart:
 /
Tag:
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Article Type:
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The ASIV is not receiving consistent power from the battery and is resetting the test sequence.  Remove the battery cover and check to make sure that the battery is making solid contact with the terminals.  If this is not the problem change the battery with a new 9 volt alkaline battery.

Question ID:
 /518
Link Title:
 /Alco-Sensor IV Tutorials
Link:
Section:
 /ASIV - RBTIV
SubPart:
 /
Tag:
 /
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Use the link below to get to the section on accuracy checks and calibrations.

More information for U.S. DOT-mandated testing programs.

Question ID:
 /528
Link Title:
 /
Link:
 
Section:
 /
SubPart:
 /
Tag:
 /
Article Type:
 /

VOID 14, or Voided Analysis, indicates that the instrument detected a possible problem with the fuel cell signal. The characteristics of each sample are compared against a set of internally stored characteristics from the last calibration or accuracy check, which would have been performed with an ethanol standard.  If the fuel cell signal being analyzed during a sample is significantly different from the stored characteristics, the instrument prefers to reject that test, flagging it as VOID 14.  

This could be caused by two scenarios. The first is a combination of normal aging of the fuel cell and long periods of time between calibrations or accuracy checks. The first thing to try would be a calibration, followed by an accuracy check (assuming you are authorized to perform calibrations). If this does not resolve the VOID 14 issue, the instrument may need to be returned to Intoximeters for service. The second possible cause would be that the sample provided contained high levels of alcohols other than ethanol. If this is suspected, the subject may be in need of immediate medical attention.”

Question ID:
 /564
Link Title:
 /RFI Document
Link:
Section:
 /
SubPart:
 /
Tag:
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RFI stands for Radio Frequency Interference.  The ASIV was originally designed to detect the presence of RF within the Alco-Sensor IV’s shielded case and send a signal to the instrument’s processor to abort the test and flag it as an RFI void.  Physical testing has since shown the instrument to be insensitive to commonly encountered RF levels.   It is not necessary to conduct an accuracy check after an RFI void – simply move away from the source of the RF, or turn off the source and conduct another test.

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